FILM: VHYES

2019 / comedy / 1h 12min / directed by Jack Henry Robbins / created by Nate Gold, , Nunzio Randazzo, Jack Henry Robbins / written by Jack Henry Robbins, Nunzio Randazzo / country: USA / language: English

A bizarre retro comedy shot entirely on VHS, VHYes takes us back to a simpler time, when twelve-year-old Ralph mistakenly records home videos and his favorite late night shows over his parents’ wedding tape. The result is a nostalgic wave of home shopping clips, censored pornography, and nefarious true-crime tales that threaten to unkindly rewind Ralph’s reality.

“Always entertaining and surprising, VHYes gives you a chaotic trip back to the 80s that’s emotionally complex, structurally brilliant, and often, laugh-out-loud funny.” -Haleigh Foutch, Collider

“…There’s something beneath the surface of VHYes that speaks to greater truths about how the analog era impacted those of us who grew up in it. And it does so in an insightful and subtly profound way, more so than its avant-garde comedy would suggest.” -Leigh Monson, Birth. Movies. Death.

VHYes has a lot going for it — chiefly the fact that the fictional shows housed within it are all extremely funny in their own right. Which makes sense: Robbins says the project began with a few comedic shorts that screened at Sundance in 2017; reverse-engineering them into a narrative feels like it was probably a much more organic process than it would have been the other way around… I didn’t expect a film that derives so much humor from combative QVC presenters and Skinemax-style erotica to leave me so teary-eyed…” -Virginia Yapp, Crooked Marquee

VHYes is a lot of things. It’s a cacophonic celebration of television and satirization of the culture that treats it as a babysitter. It’s an earnest and empathetic coming-of-age story about a little boy eager to flee from his feelings into a world of fantasy. It’s a barrage of imagery and comedy that’s chaotic, uneven, but mostly hilarious. And it’s a found-footage movie that may be a bit of a mess, but is also undeniably entrancing.” -Kristy Puchko, Pajiba

%d bloggers like this: