Lumiere Cinema



(Photo by Sarah Reingewirtz, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG), of Los Angeles Daily News

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DIRECT LINE (310) 274-6860 * INFO LINE (310) 307-3656

CONTACT LUIS, PETER, or LAUREN

9036 Wilshire Blvd, 90211; in Beverly Hills at Doheny & Wilshire (click for GoogleMap)


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FILM: HARRIET

Based on the thrilling and inspirational life of an iconic American freedom fighter, HARRIET tells the extraordinary tale of Harriet Tubman’s escape from slavery and transformation into one of America’s greatest heroes. Her courage, ingenuity, and tenacity freed hundreds of slaves and changed the course of history.

FILM: LES MISÉRABLES

Inspired by the 2005 riots in Paris, Les Misérables – directed by Ladj Ly – follows Stéphane (Damien Bonnard), a recent transplant to the impoverished suburb of Montfermeil, as he joins the local anti-crime squad. Working alongside his unscrupulous colleagues Chris (Alexis Manenti) and Gwada (Djebril Zonga), Stéphane struggles to maintain order amidst the mounting tensions between local gangs. When an arrest turns unexpectedly violent, the three officers must reckon with the aftermath and keep the neighborhood from spiraling out of control.

FILM: 63 UP

Director Michael Apted revisits the same group of British-born adults after a 7 year wait. The subjects are interviewed as to the changes that have occurred in their lives during the last seven years. 63 Up is the ninth installment of the ground-breaking 7 Up series, a study of the British class system that brings forth a new film every seven years.

FILM: PAIN AND GLORY

Pain and Glory tells of a series of reencounters experienced by Salvador Mallo, a film director in his physical decline. Some of them in the flesh, others remembered: his childhood in the 60s, when he emigrated with his parents to a village in Valencia in search of prosperity, the first desire, his first adult love in the Madrid of the 80s, the pain of the breakup of that love while it was still alive and intense, writing as the only therapy to forget the unforgettable, the early discovery of cinema, and the void, the infinite void created by the incapacity to keep on making films.Pain and Glory talks about creation, about the difficulty of separating it from one’s own life and about the passions that give it meaning and hope. In recovering his past, Salvador finds the urgent need to recount it, and in that need he also finds his salvation.

FILM: ADVOCATE

Lea Tsemel defends Palestinians: from feminists to fundamentalists, from non-violent demonstrators to armed militants. As a Jewish-Israeli lawyer who has represented political prisoners for five decades, Tsemel, in her tireless quest for justice, pushes the praxis of a human rights defender to its limits. As far as most Israelis are concerned, she defends the indefensible. As far as Palestinians are concerned, she’s more than an attorney, she’s an advocate. ADVOCATE follows Tsemel’s caseload in real-time, including the high-profile trial of a 13-year-old boy – her youngest client to date – while also revisiting her landmark cases and reflecting on the political significance of her work and the personal price one pays for assuming the role of “devil’s advocate.” Tsemel spoke truth to power before the term became trendy and she’ll continue to do so after fear makes it unfashionable. As such, she’s a model we’re hard-pressed to preserve in Israel/Palestine, and elsewhere.

FILM: VHYES

A bizarre retro comedy shot entirely on VHS, VHYes takes us back to a simpler time, when twelve-year-old Ralph mistakenly records home videos and his favorite late night shows over his parents’ wedding tape. The result is a nostalgic wave of home shopping clips, censored pornography, and nefarious true-crime tales that threaten to unkindly rewind Ralph’s reality.

FILM: A HIDDEN LIFE

(formerly titled Radegund) Based on real events, from visionary writer-director Terrence Malick, A HIDDEN LIFE is the story of an unsung hero, Franz Jägerstätter, who refused to fight for the Nazis in World War II. When the Austrian peasant farmer is faced with the threat of execution for treason, it is his unwavering faith and his love for his wife Fani and children that keeps his spirit alive.


COMING SOON :








ONE CUT OF THE DEAD Things go badly for a hack director and film crew shooting a low budget zombie movie in an abandoned WWII Japanese facility, when they are attacked by real zombies.

THE REST OF US A poised, divorced woman, Cami (Heather Graham), threatens her already tenuous relationship with her headstrong teenage daughter, Aster, when she invites her ex-husband’s second wife, Rachel (Jodi Balfour), and young daughter, Talulah, to move in with them following his unexpected death. With an unusually full home, perched on a hill overlooking their town, these four women must contend with their own grief, truths, flaws and secrets while ultimately deciding if the past will dictate their future. This dramatic comedy is the story of authentic, complex women and the messy conflicts between them.

STAGE RUSSIA: KING LEAR Yury Butusov’s brilliant, award-winning staging of King Lear tells us a story in which the collapse of a family, the collapse of a country, and the collapse of an individual are all connected to each other. In Shakespeare’s classic work, Lear imagined himself to be God’s equal – and so he divided his kingdom between his daughters just to see what would happen. Featuring 4 time Golden Mask Award-winning actor Konstantin Raikin as Lear.

HEIMAT IS A SPACE IN TIME ….picks up the biographical pieces of a family torn apart through the end of the 19th and into the 20th century. It is about people who by chance found each other, only then to lose each other. Now it is their descendants, their children and grandchildren who are beginning to disappear.

THE CORDILLERA OF DREAMS Winner of the Best Documentary award at the Cannes Film Festival, master filmmaker Patricio Guzmán’s The Cordillera of Dreams completes his trilogy (with Nostalgia for the Light and The Pearl Button) investigating the relationship between historical memory, political trauma, and geography in his native country of Chile. It centers on the imposing landscape of the Andes that run the length of the country’s Eastern border. At once protective and isolating, magisterial and indifferent, the Cordillera serves as an enigmatic focal point around which Guzmán contemplates the enduring legacy of the 1973 military coup d’état.Along the way, Guzmán interviews artists, writers, and documentarians, drawing out their conflicted feelings towards the Cordillera and its relationship to Chilean national identity and history. Among the interviewees are Vincente Gajardo and Francisco Gazitúa, sculptors who draw from the raw materials of the Cordillera to produce their artwork. Jorge Baradoit, a writer of history and fiction, discusses the continuation of Pinochet’s project in the social and economic structure of contemporary Chile. Musician Javiera Parra remembers the violence she witnessed as a child. The film’s prominent moral voice is Pablo Salas, a filmmaker and archivist who has worked since the 1980s to document acts of political resistance and state violence.Looking at both the past and future, Guzmán’s work rescues Chile from the threat of historical amnesia. He considers how the neoliberal economic policies introduced under the Pinochet regime have continued to stratify Chilean society along increasingly rigid class lines. The Cordillera may form an omnipresent backdrop to the Chilean landscape, but, like so many parts of the country, much of it is privately owned and inaccessible to the vast majority of the population. Unflinching in its presentation of contemporary Chile, The Cordillera of Dreams moves beyond despair and looks towards the possibilities of political change by linking the ideological struggles of the past with the inequalities of the present.

ROYAL OPERA HOUSE: THE SLEEPING BEAUTY The Sleeping Beauty holds a special place in The Royal Ballet’s repertory. It was the ballet with which the Company reopened the Royal Opera House in 1946 after World War II, its first production at its new home in Covent Garden. Margot Fonteyn danced the role of the beautiful Princess Aurora in the first performance, with Robert Helpmann as Prince Florimund. Sixty years later, in 2006, the original 1946 staging was revived by then Director of The Royal Ballet Monica Mason and Christopher Newton, returning Oliver Messel’s wonderful designs and glittering costumes to the stage. The masterful 19th-century choreography of Marius Petipa is combined with sections created for The Royal Ballet by Frederick Ashton, Anthony Dowell and Christopher Wheeldon. Together they create an enchanting sequence of gems in the ballet repertory – from the iconic Rose Adage, when Aurora meets her four royal suitors, and the lilting Garland Waltz to the Vision Pas de deux, as Florimund sees Aurora for the first time, and the celebratory divertissements and final pas de deux that bring the ballet to its glorious close. Throughout, Pyotr Il’yich Tchaikovsky’s masterful score takes ballet music to a height of passion, sophistication and intensity that arguably has never been surpassed. (ROH.org)

THE CAVE Shot from 2016 to 2018, The Cave belongs to the top rank of war films. Syrian director Feras Fayyad (Oscar-nominated for Last Men in Aleppo) takes us to a subterranean landscape that feels akin to the post-apocalyptic world of Mad Max. With life too dangerous above ground, survivors create a network of secret tunnels under the city of Ghouta, near Damascus, for an underground hospital maintained by women doctors. In contrast to the many Syrian documentaries made from cellphone footage or shaky cameras, Fayyad takes great care to visualize the landscape and its memorable occupants with artful cinematography. For anyone who feels jaded by Syria coverage, this work stands apart. The heart of the film is Dr. Amani, a young Syrian woman operating in unimaginable conditions with great humour and fortitude. When not tending to patients — many of whom are small children — she’s forced to justify her work to chauvinistic men who insist that a woman should be at home fulfilling domestic duties, not running a hospital. The claustrophobia of Amani’s workplace is mitigated by the high spirits of her crew, while occasional forays above ground temper relief from close quarters with harrowing scenes of a city reduced to rubble. Fayyad’s intimate portraits of the brave, tenacious hospital staff emphasize the camaraderie that buoys morale when circumstances are at their worst. There are many scenes in The Cave that can break your heart, yet the film leaves us, above all, with a powerful sense of the profound resilience, dedication, and love that endures in the midst of staggering hardship.

THE SONG OF NAMES Tim Roth and Clive Owen star in François Girard’s (Hochelaga, Land of Souls) latest sweeping historical drama, about a man searching for his childhood best friend — a Polish violin prodigy orphaned in the Holocaust — who vanished decades before on the night of his first public performance. With The Song of Names, acclaimed filmmaker François Girard returns to the classical music milieu of his seminal The Red Violin. And like that film, The Song of Names sets personal, professional, and family tragedies against sweeping historical events. Constructed like a detective mystery on a grand scale, the film opens the night of the much-anticipated first public performance by Dovidl Rapoport, a Polish musical prodigy. When he doesn’t show up, his best friend Martin is left to tell the packed theatre that the performance will not go on. Decades later, an adult Martin (Tim Roth), serving as a judge in a musical competition, watches a young student prepare to play in Dovidl’s unique style. This moment sends Martin, over the objections of his wife Helen, on a transcontinental search. As the mystery of the disappearance unravels, Martin finds himself consumed by memories of the deep bond between the two boys — and also uncovering elements of Dovidl’s tormented life that Martin simply couldn’t have fathomed at the time. An emotionally devastating tale of family, obligation, ambition, and friendship, Girard’s film is, unsurprisingly, driven by exquisite music. It is also extraordinarily timely, focusing on the tragic circumstances of the migrant — whose departure is often (if not usually) motivated by forces far beyond their control. Featuring touching performances by Roth, Clive Owen, Catherine McCormack, Saul Rubinek and an extremely talented young cast as the junior versions of Martin and Dovidl, The Song of Names is a powerful call to remember. (of TIFF.net)


PRESS ABOUT US, THANK YOU:

“…Lumiere will compete to show the kind of elevated, critically supported indie, international and documentary films that can bring a theater both cachet and those coveted specialized audiences. And if a buzzier new movie can premiere exclusively at the Music Hall, as was recently the case with the highly praised documentary “Chinese Portrait,” so much the better.” – Gary Goldstein, Los Angeles Times

Beverly Hills Courier

“Los Angeles film exhibition 2020 is off to a roaring start with the reincarnation of the Laemmle Music Hall into Lumiere Cinema at the Music Hall,” Bob Hunter, director of exhibition for “Heimat” and “Cordillera” distributor Icarus Films, wrote in an emailed statement. “It’s a welcome addition to L.A.’s arthouse landscape and sure to become an essential destination for lovers of challenging, adventurous cinema. Working with Luis, Peter, and Lauren has been a pleasure. Their passion for independent film and commitment to the theatrical experience are infectious.” – Bob Strauss, Daily News


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LUMIERE CINEMA, MUSIC HALL 3, est. 2019